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News News News (newest at the top):

10.27.14: We present two of our four 2014 chapbooks, published today. The other two, Laura Bylenok's A/o and Khaty Xiong's Deer Hour, will be released in November.

The best way to get the chapbooks is to just subscribe to the whole 2014 series. Individually the chapbooks are $9 ea + shipping. If you buy all four, we'll ship them to you when they're out (the first two ship now) for $30, shipping included. So:

 

Too, we'll be opening up our yearly chapbook contest in November. Details on the contest page when they're ready.

   

The 2014 Chapbook Contest Winner, Jessica Johnson's In Absolutes We Seek Each Other: Poems

Johnson's poems, full of quiet and gracious observation, are acts of kinship-in-strangeness with the natural world. Even the slightest creatures are alive with vision. —Joanna Klink

For a moment, reader, as you orient yourself in one of Jessica Johnson's poems, you might classify a scene as quiet and scientific, or moody, wet, and metrical; then a shift and, god, it's luminous and grief-struck and haunting and it's yours. The linked poems in the book's first section are a feat of beauty: transformation and lost innocence set in a glimmering laboratory. The second section of ocean dwellers, anatomies, and sea-soaked lyrics is equally remarkable. Jessica Johnson is a true discovery. —Kathleen Flenniken

Poems, 5"x8", 60pp., $9, ISBN 978-1-934832-44-8. [press release & order form]

 

   

A finalist in the 2014 Chapbook Contest, Mark Holden's No One Wants to Live Here: Stories

In No One Wants to Live Here, Mark Holden turns fantasy and reality inside out, showing us the frail thread that holds them together and the raw edges that our superegos scrabble to keep hidden—the things we would never want to reveal in a million years. But in this world, to quote one of his characters, "a million years was up." Holden's sharp, deadpan eye is a seam-ripper that lays bare our tattered, basted-together interiors. —Kate Moses

The mundane and the shocking are neighbors in Mark Holden's powerful collection of stories No One Wants to Live Here. So are his characters—neighbors who watch one another. They are ordinary people, farmers, prison guards and waitresses, a new mother, a cameraman for a local news channel. But the normalcy ends there, because these ordinary people sometimes get out their arsenals of weapons and kill one another. But then maybe that is normal, too. Writing in sublimely simple prose, stripped bare of any unnecessary flourishes, Holden paints a picture of bland and lonely, so-called "ordinary" lives in which extraordinary cruel acts transpire, and in doing so he shows us how such extreme acts have become irrevocably stitched into the fabric of American life. —Elizabeth Cohen

The stories in Mark Holden's No One Wants to Live Here are suggestive and sparse, apparently without affect. In conjunction with their startling plots, the effect is one of a dazzling muteness. —Steve Shipps

Stories, 5"x8", 64pp., $9, ISBN 978-1-934832-45-5. [press release & order form]